The Studio Museum in Harlem

Yesterday, I got to hang out at the Studio Museum in Harlem for a bit. I didn’t get to look at the new exhibit (I had to rush out to head to work), but I did get a peek at the books in their Museum Store, and I totally need to read them!

 

wpid-20140410_155939.jpgI love fairy tales, so I need to read Rapunzel, with that long beautiful braided hair of hers. Neighborhood Mother Goose looks interesting for similar fairy tale-esque reasons. Anansi the Spider is probably the most well known African myth (for as little as Americans, myself included, know about different African folklore and myth tales). But really, I just want to read them all and I want to see more books like this in mainstream bookstores. Where’s the shelf for these books, Barnes and Noble (outside of Black History Month)?

I just started volunteering at the Studio Museum, hopefully I get to do more things there. The employees seem really fun and cool, and most of the people who walked in the building yesterday were ridiculously stylish. I can’t stop thinking about this woman’s flowered skirt with pockets (!!) and contrasted teal tulle underneath that you can’t buy anywhere because she had her friend make it for her. But that’s off the point of the post and the blog in general. I can’t wait to go back and I hope I can read (and afford to buy) some of those books.

Here are some pictures from their quarterly magazine:

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Books for Kids

Activity examples for educators and parents

Activity examples for educators and parents

Reading is, of course, very important to nurture as a child, but so is art. They often go hand in hand. Kids will often want to create art based on books they’ve read and characters they love. More diverse children’s books creates more diverse art. We need more of that in the world.

Visit the Studio Museum in Harlem, on 125th Street between Lenox and Adam Clayton Powell Jr Ave (7th Avenue for any locals). $7 Suggested Admission for Adults, $3 for Students and Seniors, Free for children under 12. http://www.studiomuseum.org/ 

 

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8 Racist Children’s Books via Atlantic BlackStar | The Place Children’s Lit Can Take in Shaping Young Opinions

8 Disturbingly Racist Children’s Books Designed to Devalue Black People – Atlanta Black Star.

Hmm, fitting that on the last day of Black History Month, I come across this post of old, racist children’s books that perpetuate hate and stereotypes. My jaw dropped as I looked at these books, but it’s really eye-opening in terms of really looking at our children’s books as media messages. I’m sure (I hope? Unfortunately I can’t say with any accuracy, with the way things have been going in recent media) that these books are, if not burned, tucked away in some vaults where no children can find them. Interestingly enough, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is on this list, a book fraught with controversy in terms of its language regarding black people during slavery–it’s been argued back and forth.

The existence of these books proves our need for the very opposite. These books were meant to teach and inform white children of the “traits” of black people. Now we need books that promote and edify the culture of black people and other cultures. Children reading more and more positive portrayals shows them new worlds, opinions, and points of view. But often in school, as I’ve written in another post, there’s only one book per year that focuses on black literature and culture. We’re lucky if we get other perspectives than that.

Children’s literature does even more of a job of shaping and forming opinions than adult literature does, so we need to be careful what’s being explicitly and implicitly brought forth in their books. If children’s lit showcased more cultures, they will experience more world’s different from their own and be able to connect to people who are different from them both as children and as they grow into adults.

Related:

Children’s Books That Nurture Healthy Self-Esteem in Black Toddlers

Black Children’s Books: Our Favorite Stories For African American Youngsters

Words Have Power {Book Display}

Positive Images of Black Children and Families in Children’s Lit